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Quigley-Hoban Crosier.  Originally belonging to Archbishop Quigley of Buffalo, NY who later transferred to Chicago; it was then given to Cardinal Mundelein who later gave it to Archbishop Hoban when he was in Rockford, Ill. before coming to Cleveland it was last used on December 23, 1980 by  Bishop A. Pilla; gold-plated brass.

The crosier
(known as the pastoral staff, from the Latin pastor, shepherd) is shaped like a shepherd's crook. A bishop or church head bears this staff as "shepherd of the flock of God", particularly the community under his canonical jurisdiction.

The Agnus Dei is a setting of the "Lamb of God" litany, based on John the Baptist's reference in John 1:29 to Jesus ("Behold the Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world")



Bishop Pevec Pectoral Cross

The word pectoral derives from the Latin pectus, meaning “breast.”  This cross is attached to a chain (or cord) and is worn on the chest, near the heart.  In the earliest times, the pectoral cross contained a relic of the True Cross or even of a saint.    When putting on the pectoral cross, traditionally the bishop says, “Munire me digneris,” asking the Lord for strength and protection against all evil and all enemies, and to be mindful of His passion and cross.

The bishops ring  is  a  band that  symbolizes the bishop is “wedded” to his diocese.  In the past  the ring would be used to make the imprint of the bishop’s seal in the hot wax to authenticate documents.

From the collection of the Catholic Diocese of Celveland

A. 14k gold ring set with a large purple cabochon stone (a variety of star moonstone) ringed in a border of twenty small faceted brilliant diamonds in a silver/white gold setting; belonged to Bp. Issenmann; later used by Bp. Pilla from the 29th of June 1999 to the 10th of April 2006.

B.
Issenmann Ring I.  14k gold ring; silver/white gold border with leaf/laurel patterns around a large oval faceted amethyst; belonged to Bp. Issenmann.

C.
Issenmann Ring II.  14k gold ring set with a large purple cabochon stone (a variety of star moonstone) ringed in a border of twenty small faceted brilliant diamonds in a silver/white gold setting; belonged to Bp. Issenmann; later used by Bp. Pilla from the 29th of June 1999 to the 10th of April 2006.

Bishop Hoban Zucchetto
The zucchetto originated as the Greek pilos and is related to the beret (which itself was originally a large zucchetto). It was adopted circa the Early Middle Ages, if not earlier, to keep clerics' heads warm. Its name derives from its resemblance to half a pumpkin.

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